Last year, Islander Ken Edwards placed a large bird box constructed for the American Kestral within Parade Grounds meadows maintained by Fishers Island Conservancy. We are all hoping this smallest and most delicate falcon will nest.

Today, I was happy to see three Kestrals diving and darting, hunting and hovering midst trees closest to South beach.

From the Field, Field Note, Justine Kibbe, April 17, 2019

Within the warmth of a blue-sky day, a Barred owl hides out West End, Fishers Island.

My neck of the woods…

From the Field, Field Note, Justine Kibbe, April 16, 2019

Eastern painted turtles gathering between sun and shadow.

From the Field, Field Note, Justine Kibbe, April 9, 2019

Black-crowned Night Heron roosting this afternoon in treetops within Ferguson Museum Sanctuary, Fishers Island. At just about sunset, this nocturnal resident will forage for fish at Duck pond.

With remarks From the Field, this week marks the return of Great Blue Herons as well as Great Egrets, especially in coves northside.

Keep your eyes peeled…

From the Field, Field Note, Justine Kibbe, April 9, 2019

Piping Plover pair returns. House hunting on Sanctuary of Sands, Fishers Island.

Please tread lightly.

From the Field, Field Note, Justine Kibbe, April 6, 2019

A pair of American oystercatchers has returned to Fishers Island. FIConservancy Naturalist Justine Kibbe observed their arrival at approximately 2 p.m. March 29 on Stony Beach in Hay Harbor.

“Time will tell if the two also include Sanctuary of Sands territory. As far as I know, there are five individual American oystercatchers on the West End,” Ms. Kibbe said.

“I tell young students that there is a great need on-Island to provide safe sanctuary and healthy habitat for dwindling wildlife.”

The American oystercatcher, occasionally called the American pied oystercatcher, was originally called the “sea pie”. It was renamed in 1731, when naturalist Mark Catesby observed the bird eating oysters. Oystercatchers feed on crustaceans and molluscs and are able to open crab shells and oysters with their strong red beaks. Justine Kibbe Photo

Still out in the field at Big Stony while everyone awaits a report of “good news”, anticipating the raising of sunken fishing vessel “All for Joy”.

Meanwhile, my joyous moment was to document at approximately 2 p.m. today, March 29—“on the dot”—the arrival AND landing of returning American oystercatcher pair! Time will tell if the two also include Sanctuary of Sands territory. As far as I know, there are 5 individual birds West End, Fishers Island.

*Please continue to help support and sustain critical habitat.

From the Field, Field Note, Justine Kibbe, Mar. 29, 2019

First Peep to “Pipe Up!”

I’ve just observed the first Piping Plover to return to Sanctuary of Sands, Fishers Island. With coastal development, habitat for these shorebirds has become critical. Now listed as a “threatened species”, the delicate Piping Plover has returned to the sandy shoals parallel to our airport runway for several years now.

Last year, the New York Dept. of Environmental Conservation and I counted 3 adults and a surviving clutch of 4. PLEASE welcome again these “peeps” and kindly leash all dogs…

*archived photos

From the Field, Field Note, Justine Kibbe, Mar. 28, 2019