Moths of Fishers Island

  • Yellow-shouldered slug

    yellow shouldered slug moth
  • Wavy-lined heterocampa

    wavy line heterocampa moth
  • The Beggar

    the beggar moth
  • Eastern Tent Caterpillar

    Eastern tent caterpillar
  • Skiff moth

    skiff moth
  • Primrose moth

    Schinia florida moth
  • Small-eyed sphinx

    Paonias myops moth
  • Cecropia moth

    Hyalophora cecropia moth
  • Rose hooktip

    Rose hooktip moth
  • Hag moth

    Hag moth
  • Green Leuconycta

    Green leuconycta moth
  • Greater grapevine looper

    greater grapevine looper moth
  • Forest tent caterpillar

    forest tent caterpillar
  • Alianthus webworm

    Alianthus webworm
  • Green Marvel

    Acronicta fallax moth Fishers Island 2015
  • Azalea sphinx

    Azalea Sphinx Moth
  • Azalea sphinx

    azalea sphinx moth
  • Pandorus Sphinx

    Pandorus Sphinx Moth
  • Luna Moth

    Luna moth, male
  • Io moth

    Automeris io moth

Moths pollinate plants, and as caterpillars, they provide a significant food source for wildlife. Since many moths eat only one or two kinds of native plants, identifying moths indicates the range and strength of Fishers Island’s contribution to the food web.

Doug Tallamy, professor of entomology at the University of Delaware, and his PhD candidate, Adam Mitchell, trapped moths on Fishers Island between 2014 and 2017. Their images reveal the diverse and unexpected beauty of moths.

To learn more about each moth, click on the images below:

yellow shouldered slug moth
wavy line heterocampa moth
the beggar moth
Eastern tent caterpillar
skiff moth
Schinia florida moth
Paonias myops moth
Hyalophora cecropia moth
Rose hooktip moth
Hag moth
Green leuconycta moth
greater grapevine looper moth
forest tent caterpillar
Alianthus webworm
Acronicta fallax moth Fishers Island 2015
Azalea Sphinx Moth
Pandorus Sphinx Moth
Luna moth, male
Automeris io moth